Choosing the Right Metal for Die Casting

Die casting is valuable in many industries for cost effectiveness in large-scale production, with short fabrication times per part and little to no need for machining afterward. Components made by die casting are found in automobiles, medical equipment, toys, heavy machinery, decorations and more. A variety of non-ferrous metals can be die cast, and choosing one appropriate to the product’s specifications is important.

Common Die Casting Metals

Die casting employs a range of non-ferrous metals and alloys, with specific compositions graded for optimal casting. Zinc and aluminum die castings are especially common, as they cast easily due to low melting temperatures and their alloys possess high strength. Conversely, copper alloys see use when corrosion and wear resistance are most important; tin and lead alloys, while less common, are similarly useful here. Magnesium, like aluminum, has a high strength-to-weight ratio, and magnesium alloys are used when parts must be as lightweight as possible.

Picking Alloys for Casting

The alloys most commonly used for die casting have various trade-offs in physical and mechanical properties, ease of fabrication and economic efficiency. There is no “one size fits all” casting metal. Selecting the ideal alloy, then, requires an assessment of what properties are most important for your product and fabrication process. Major factors include:

  • structural properties such as strength-to-weight ratio and dimensional tolerances, including how these vary based on temperature
  • impact strength and resistance to deformation or fracture
  • surface finish quality, both at fabrication and over time
  • corrosion and abrasion resistance
  • ease of machining
  • alloy cost and cost of casting, based on precision, necessary machining and the wear inflicted on die steels during production

Data on die casting alloys, including how properties differ as the composition changes, are frequently made available via engineering and industry standards. To best match an alloy to a particular project, it’s best to consult with experts in metallurgy and die casting, whether in-house or via manufacturing partners.…

Protect Equipment With Lubricant Filtration

Whenever you have machinery with moving parts, proper lubrication is a must. Without it, the wear and tear and potential damage to those friction points can mean expensive repairs and replacements on a consistent basis. However, it isn’t enough to apply any lubrication, you also need to know which products are best and how to prevent your chosen lubricant from becoming contaminated during or after the production process.

Lubricant Filtration

For many professionals in the manufacturing business, this means appropriately filtering all solid particles, or non-lubricants, out before using the product on their machinery. The question then becomes how to recognize the best industrial lubricant richmond va filters available.

Types of Filters

Of course, there are many types of filters to consider, including

  • Bi-component filters
  • Breather filters (primarily used in reservoirs)
  • Disk filters
  • Membrane filters
  • Pleated depth filters
  • Screen filters
  • Standard filters
  • Strainers
  • Suction filters
  • Pressure filters
  • Reverse-flow filters

This list could be much longer. With so many options, it may be difficult to determine the specific type best for your machinery and application.

Local Requirements and Plant Needs

Before getting into the details of filters and lubricant filtration systems, spend some time looking at the legal requirements in your area. Some industries must consider how waste is handled and filtration systems are affected by those laws. Next, carefully weigh your manufacturing needs with the long-term savings that proper lubrication and filtration can provide. After considering these factors, turn your attention to the technical features of filters.

Filter Specifications

Which filters are best for the lubricants you intend to use? Make sure that your chosen filter is compatible with the oils and grease you’ll expose it to. You should also pay attention to the filter’s ability to withstand extreme temperatures, high levels of pressure, and a heavy volumetric flow. In some cases, you may look into special features, such as whether a fiberglass fleece provides improved performance.

Proper filtering may be as important to the service life of equipment as proper lubrication is. Be sure to carefully research your options for the best results.…